How Angry Can One Article Make You?

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Over the past few days, Samantha Brick’s ‘Why women hate me for being beautiful’ has caused an internet sensation, being featured as a discussion on numerous TV and radio shows, trending on Twitter and receiving over five thousand comments on The Daily Mail online in which the original article was published.                                                                                                                        

The article explains Brick’s view that because she has, in her own words, "lovely looks" other women dislike her, and it has stopped her getting jobs, promotions, making friends and means she has been "ridiculed" by other women concerned that their husbands fancy her.

After reading this article, and her latest one in which she states the backlash just "proves her point", I can say it has made me, along with many other women, very angry.

There is a well known phrase that states: "Women would rule the world if they didn’t all hate each other" which along with Brick’s article is total rubbish.

It’s possible, (but I think, highly unlikely) that Brick has never met any nice women in her life. Maybe every single person she’s ever worked with and every woman she has ever come across in a social situation has been hideous and insanely jealous of her, hell-bent on making sure their husbands who are all unbelievably besotted with her good looks stay well away.

Perhaps in their 'ugly girls club’ they have decided to ridicule and isolate her until she gets the message. This may sound ridiculous but it is the impression you get of her life and her view on the majority of women.

Most of the backlash of criticisms for this article have attacked Brick’s own looks, people stating she’s "overly arrogant" and "ugly" and she has said this goes towards proving her point, that people hate a woman for being, or admitting to being, attractive, but my opinion on her article would be the same whether we knew what she looked like or not.

As someone with a very close set of lovely looking female friends, one of who is now a successful model, I’m no stranger to the female-envy. You can wish you had things others do and perhaps have moments of low confidence after seeing a friend be admired while you’re pushed to the sidelines, but does this make you dislike them, or decide you no longer want to be friends with them?

Do their good looks have any real impact on what your friendship is like? I would like to think 99% of women would answer no, and hope Samantha Brick, and not myself, is the deluded one.

If she didn’t get a promotion under a female boss, maybe she wasn’t as good at the job as she thought, or came across as arrogant, another criticism made of her article.

If females don’t want to be her friend then maybe her attitude needs an adjustment or she’s just not a very nice person. And can I also ask about these random men who apparently give her flowers on the street, champagne on flights and buy train tickets for her? If any women know of these types of men please say…  

There seems to be an image portrayed that many women are bitchy and jealous of each other, and while this may be true for some, in my experience it’s only a very small minority.

Maybe Brick has been very unfortunate to meet a lot of these types and does deserve our sympathy, but I’d like to think most women are down to earth, friendly, and nothing but proud when they see a friend of theirs succeed. The Spice Girls fought for girl power and I think with many that attitude still stands.      

Brick blames her attractiveness for the fact she has never been a bridesmaid, but I’m pretty sure, as with the mass majority of females, when I get to the stage of choosing bridesmaids it will be based on who I want to share in that special day with me because I love them enough and they’ve been a great friend, and not on who will look worst in their bridesmaids outfit. 

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